2008 record      

 

Strong U.S. Auto Sales Fueled by Growing Economic Optimism

Vehicle purchase intent remained robust in November, as deep discounts on outgoing models, and a strengthening economy provide consumers with a favorable environment to purchase new vehicles. TechnoMetrica’s Auto Demand Index improved for the second straight month in November, gaining one point to register a score of 111. Therefore, we expect auto sales will conclude the year maintaining a strong pace of growth.

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The Two Americas: Sour Oil Patch Vs. Rest Of U.S.

Americans were more upbeat in the latest IBD/TIPP Economic Optimism Index. But there was a marked split between those living in states thumped by the plunge in oil prices, and those outside the energy patch who were benefitting from cheaper gasoline prices.

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New Car Buying Likely to Slow in Q2

TechnoMetrica's Auto Demand Index for April at 67, following a precipitous 45-point drop in March to 49, sends a confirmatory signal of an imminent slowdown of U.S. car sales. Over one-fourth (26%) of consumers say they are postponing car purchases as a result of high gasoline prices.

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Misplacing The Blame For High Oil

Energy Policy: That gas prices are edging ever closer to $4 a gallon is bad enough. But even worse is the fact that the public blames the wrong villains. No wonder President Obama seems so unconcerned.

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Gas Slams Auto Demand Index

Americans shopping for a new car are slamming on the brakes, as higher gasoline prices ravaged demand this month, according to TechnoMetrica's Auto Demand survey.

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Consumers Lean Toward Smaller Cars As Prices Rise: Survey

Rising fuel prices generally lead customers to look for smaller cars. If prices rise more dramatically, they might consider cars that use alternate fuels. But if fuel prices shoot up, demand for new cars could drop at double-digit rates. This is a prospect that no vehicle manufacturer wants to consider.

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Post oil: Glimpses of life after fossil fuel

Americans like to imagine the future. From the world's fairs of the early 20th century to futuristic magazine features in the 1950s to the 1980s "Back to the Future" films, we love dreaming up what might come next.

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